The Placement of Implants In Breast Augmentation

The Placement of Implants In Breast Augmentation

Important choices in the breast augmentation process include things like size, texture, fill and shape. You will also need to decide on placement of the implant. Your primary choice for placement will be either above the pectoral muscle, or below it. Lifestyle, work, and the priority of the patient will most often determine which option is best.

To realize your ideal results, you’ll need to compile a list of priorities for your doctor. This will ensure that you get the results most important to you. Speak to your doctor about how you prioritize things like cleavage, control of rippling, easy recovery, and softness.

Because no two women will have the exact same implants, or the same procedure, a through consultation with your surgeon will ensure that you have control over as many aspects of the procedure as possible.

The next step in the process is making sure that your doctor is clear to you about what each option entails. Don’t get lost in medical jargon. Make sure that you have a firm understanding of every term, and if you don’t know, be sure to ask.

If your implant is positioned in a sub glandular position, this means that it’s resting beneath the mammary gland. Technically, all implants are sub glandular. Retroglandular and submammary, refer to placement under the mammary gland and above the pectoral muscle.

There are many advantages to sub glandular positioning, such as an easier procedure, shorter recovery time, and movement of the pectoral will not affect the implant. It’s also less likely that the patient will need a breast lift. Women in some professions, such as bodybuilders, will likely benefit from this positioning.

There are also factors to consider with this placement. There is more risk of capsular contracture with sub glandular placement. Patients may have trouble during mammography. Rippling may occur, and patients may need a breast lift procedure.

Sub pectoral placements are located beneath the pectoral muscle. There are advantages to this position as well, such as reduced rippling, and lower occurrences of capsular contracture.

Bear in mind, however, that this position may require a longer recovery time, and you may notice odd effects while flexing the pectoral muscles.

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